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Breastmilk Basics for Newborns

We aren’t going to sugarcoat it: breastfeeding can be really, really hard for both the mom and the baby in the beginning. But remember, this is a learning experience, so be patient and loving to yourself and your baby as the two of you practice this new skill. Once you two get the hang of it, breastfeeding becomes much easier and much more enjoyable. Here’s our tips for what to expect and what you need to know for those early days and weeks.

Breastmilk Basics for Newborns

We aren’t going to sugarcoat it: breastfeeding can be really, really hard for both the mom and the baby in the beginning. But remember, this is a learning experience, so be patient and loving to yourself and your baby as the two of you practice this new skill. Once you two get the hang of it, breastfeeding becomes much easier and much more enjoyable. Here’s our tips for what to expect and what you need to know for those early days and weeks.

When you first start breastfeeding, you produce colostrum, which is known as “liquid gold” because it’s nutrient-dense and yellow in color. In the beginning, your baby needs only a very small amount of colostrum (about 1 tablespoon over the course of the day), so don’t expect your baby to need ounces of breastmilk right away. Generally, your milk won’t come in until around day 5 post-delivery, and your baby can rely on the colostrum and some transitional milk in the meantime. Towards the end of pregnancy and in those early days, there’s now a way to store colostrum if that’s something you want to do with this collection kit.

Really, your goal in that first week is to get your baby to latch and practice feeding. This gives them much-needed practice, while also consistently stimulating your breasts so that your milk comes in. To put it in the simplest terms, the more you feed, the more breast milk you produce. That’s why it’s important to be as regular as possible. If you feel like your baby is not latching appropriately in those early days, be patient – but don’t be afraid to reach out for help. Lactation consultants can give you expert advice that will get you and your little one set up for success!  

As always, these are suggestions and not intended for all babies. Make sure to discuss any questions or concerns with your pediatrician. 

Shop all of our favorite Breastfeeding and Pumping Essentials here. Want to learn more about the basics of feeding your growing child? Check out our other breastfeeding and feeding resources:

And make sure to take our Feeding Your Baby Solids course once your baby is 3 months or older. Trust us, it will be the best money and money spent.